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Graphic Designer Creates Simplified Maps To Explain Proposed Bus Network


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A Dublin-based graphic designer says he has created simplified maps for the city's proposed new bus network to help people understand the benefits of it.

Following criticism and confusion of the planned complete overhaul, the Bus Connects public consultation has been extended until the end of September.

Passengers are being encouraged to have their say on plans to change the look, layout and frequency of routes.

Kevin Carter, who started designing transport maps "for fun", believes the idea is good - but needs to be explained better.

So far, the graphic designer has created simplified maps for the proposed A and B spines.

Kevin said he intends to "do my best to get it all done as fast as I can so that people can have a better understanding of what I think is a really good idea". 

Those behind the plan say it will create a faster, more predictable and reliable bus service for Dublin.

The complete redesign will mean more passengers can get to more places quicker than they can on the current network.

The Bus Connects proposal will also do away with cash payments, and see passengers able to pay using their Leap, credit or debit cards, as well as by tapping their contactless device.

Other benefits being put forward by transport officials are more bus corridors, more bus shelters and more energy efficient buses.

Criticism and Confusion

The Bus Connects proposal has come in for much criticism, with both passengers and politicians slating it.

Much of the concern centres on swapping numbered routes for lettered ones, as well as changing the colour of buses.

Some other concerns raised include bus routes being "axed", having to walk further to get to a stop and buses arriving less often.

However, Kevin Carter believes many fears are borne out of confusion, and that most people would be happy with the proposed service if it was clearly explained to them.

"Certain politicians are telling local residents that buses are being axed, which is angering people", he said.

The graphic-designer believes politicians are "getting people angry because they want to be seen to be solving a problem which they have created themselves, which is just whipping up anger and fear".

"The whole point of this process is to get people's reactions and to get people's feedback", he said.

Bus Connects is encouraging people to look into how the changes would affect them, and to give it reaction and feedback until the end of September at this link.


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