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Sport Pays Tribute to Mandela

Sport

Sport Pays Tribute to Mandela

98FM
98FM

07:50 6 Dec 2013


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Fifa president Sepp Blatter has led the sporting tributes to his "dear friend", South Africa's first black president Nelson Mandela, who died aged 95. Mr Mandela had used sport to bring his country together following strict racial segregation by his predecessors. Blatter said: "It is in deep mourning that I pay my respects to an extraordinary person. "He and I shared an unwavering belief in the extraordinary power of football to unite people."
Blatter added: "He was probably one of the greatest humanists of our time."

Mr Mandela once stated: "Sport has the power to change the world. It has the power to inspire, it has the power to unite people, in a way that little else does." Fifa's president hailed Mr Mandela's impact on football's 2010 World Cup in South Africa and said there would be a minute's silence as a mark of respect ahead of the next round of international matches. "When he was honoured and cheered by the crowd at Johannesburg's Soccer City stadium on 11 July 2010, it was as a man of the people, a man of their hearts. "It was one of the most moving moments I have ever experienced. For him, the World Cup in South Africa truly was 'a dream come true'," Blatter added.
After he was elected as president in 1994, the 1995 Rugby World Cup was to be the showcase event for Mr Mandela's unifying agenda in South Africa.

One of the defining sporting images of the century was to follow in the final when, after South Africa's 15-12 extra-time victory against favourites New Zealand, Springboks captain Francois Pienaar was handed the trophy by Mr Mandela. In that moment, racially divided South Africa came together in a way unimaginable during the 27 years the Nobel Peace Prize winner was incarcerated for his actions in the fight against apartheid. South Africa rugby tweeted: "Rest in Peace Nelson Mandela. We will never forget the role you played in our country, in our sport, and for that we are eternally grateful." Joost van der Westhuizen, who played in the 1995 World Cup final, said on Twitter: "A sad day for our country. Rest in Peace Madiba. Condolences to his family and friends."

Six-time Olympic champion Usain Bolt also paid his respects: "One of the greatest human beings ever..May your soul rest in peace..The world's greatest fighter..." Speaking in 2003 about the 1995 Rugby World Cup final, former South Africa captain Pienaar said "What happened was Nelson Mandela said, 'thank you very much for what you've done for South Africa', but I said, 'thank you for what you've done'. "I almost felt like hugging him but it wasn't appropriate, I guess."


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